The Cross House

More Wallpaper Adventures!

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On the ceiling of the Cross House second-floor main hall/stair, there are layers of revealed time. On the right is the 1894 ceiling paper. Cool. Way cool. Over the 1894 paper are layers of later paper (left), then 1×2 nailing strips for 1950s 12×12 ceiling tiles.

 

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The 1894 paper was papered over with this. Such work was done before the Cross House was converted into apartments in the 1920s.

 

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A close-up.

 

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Then, there were several more layers of paper added, the above being the final layer. Late 1930s?

 

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A close-up. Silver on a pale pinky beige background.

 

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Then all the paper was covered over (and protected) by 1950s ceiling tiles. One wonders why they don’t make such cool tiles today? I am carefully saving these tiles (of course!), and have the perfect place to relocate them to.

 

3 Responses to More Wallpaper Adventures!

  1. Ross, You said “One wonders why they don’t make such cool tiles today? I am carefully saving these tiles (of course!), and have the perfect place to relocate them to.” You might post this query at retrorenovation.com. That site has links to many producers of ’50s products (sinks, faucets, doors, lights(?), ceramic tiles, flooring, etc.), and it’s possible someone there will know of a source for similar ceiling tiles.

  2. Seriously Ross evaluate the flammability of those tiles. Some of those tiles and the adhesives used to cement them to plaster have been implicated in many fast moving and deadly fires in the past. The deadly fires at St. Anthony’s hospital in Effingham, Ill. and Our Lady of the Angels School in Chicago both were spread in part by these highly flammable ceiling finishes. My friend’s sister Carol Ann died in the fire at Our Lady of the Angels. If they are dangerous it just isn’t worth it to reuse them somewhere.

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