The Cross House

A 54 Degree Adventure

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Today it was a balmy 54 degrees, and this seemed like perfect weather to attack the cornice on the north porch, which sticks out like a sore thumb. I extended the mini-scaffolding outward, got suited up in Tyvek overalls and a mask, revved up the grinder, and went at it.

 

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All grinded, erasing countless blemishes and paint build up. Tomorrow I will scrape and hand sand the curly cues, and perhaps be able to get the cornice primed. Monday will be a blistering 59 degrees, and maybe I will be able to get the final coat on. I also hope to finish the triple windows, and get the restored stained-glass back it. That will be a BIG whoee moment! The weather will collapse on Tuesday, and the rest of the week looks grim. So, a lot to do during the next three days! And I also have to deal with an entirely new year!

 

 

 

9 Responses to A 54 Degree Adventure

  1. I think it’s interesting that the Cross house didn’t originally have the details painted a different color (as was the case when the house was blue and white). You’d think they’d be either painted to stand out, or not be there in the first place.

    • The reason they’re in relief is so the details stand out when they’re painted all one colour. If they’re going to stand out due to the colour, they might as well be flat. It would have been very rare to have such details painted in contrasting colours when the Cross House was built. That trend got going in the 1960s.

      • I agree, Kit.

        The “painted lady” style of painting began with hippies in the 1960s as a way to update “gloomy old Victorians”.

        I have an 1895 image of the Cross House and it clearly shows that the cornice curly cues are painted the same color as the background. Even with both the same color, the details are highly obvious.

    • Hi Tiffany,

      If you look at the first image, you can see how much the curly cues stand out even painted the same color as the background.

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