The Cross House

CARRIAGE HOUSE: Part 1

I did a previous post on the curious history of the carriage house adjacent to the Cross House.

Today, I would like to present my highly sophisticated drawings using the latest in high-def 4-D imaging technology. Prepare to be AGOG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

This is a 1905 Sanborn map, showing the Cross House to the left (north) and its carriage house to the right (south). The carriage house has a one-story wing to the left, and the main block is two-stories. The dotted lines in one corner represent a porch.
This is a 1905 Sanborn map, showing the 1894 Cross House to the left (north) and its carriage house to the right (south). The carriage house has a one-story wing to the left, and the main block is two-stories. The dotted lines in one corner represent a porch. The curved bay was actually an angled bay on the second floor.

 

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The 1894 carriage house was RIGHT against the alley. It sat on the ground (no basement or crawl space). There was a 1-story north wing which likely had a dirt floor, and was likely the barn for the horses. There was also a 2-story section, which likely housed the carriage(s), a workroom, and general storage. This may have had a wood floor. Or maybe dirt, too. The dotted lines at the bottom of the image represent the overhanging bay on the second floor.

 

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In 1921, a basement was built right in front of the 2-story section, which was separated from the 1-story north wing, and then lifted up and moved onto the basement.

 

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Then the basement was extended to the east, the north wing was turned 90-degrees, and placed atop the basement extension.

 

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When the work was completed, a “new” house was the result. The first-floor interior was finished in the fashionable mission-style, while the second-floor interior remained kinda the same, except that the wood ceilings and walls were replaced with proper plaster on lath. A massive L-shaped porch was added to the front (facing west). The original architect, Charles Squires, may well have done the conversion (he lived a block away).

 

UPDATE: In a much later post, I detail numerous new discoveries about the carriage house, negating some of what has been written above.

2 Responses to CARRIAGE HOUSE: Part 1

  1. Love the drawings!!! and the explanation of the events that brought the carriage house to its current location is fascinating. I would have never thought it had not always been where it is.

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