The Cross House

Roundly Excited

 

The long long long missing round window to the stair tower is almost ready. 

 

There are two such windows. One was restored last year, but this matching window has taken forever.

But, it now has new glass, the glazing is done, as is the priming and painting.

Next, will be the laborious and careful scraping required to created laser-sharp edges where paint meets glass. This is easy with straight lines but a tedious process with curved edges. However, what do I care about the price of beauty? Beauty before all! Beauty before all!

 

So…soon! Soon!

 

 

4 Responses to Roundly Excited

  1. How is the bottom of the jamb and sill detailed for drainage? It appears this is a square sash that sits on the inside of the visible frame? Where does water go that runs down the face of the sash?

    I’ve seen plenty of windows with arched or curved tops that have a larger rectangular sash that sits behind the curved top of the jamb, but there’s no drainage issue, since it overlaps behind the frame at the top. I’ve just never seen it at the bottom. The round windows I’ve seen have been round sashes that fit in a round frame, with a sloped sill in the bottom half. Some have been sashes that sit on axles at either side so they rotate in at the top, out at the bottom. I’ve seen others (in mid-century buildings) that are split sashes, with the bottom half rotating about a bearing at the center!

      • That is impressive! I guess they are recessed into the jambs and have generous drip edges above, which coupled with the short height probably doesn’t result in much water actually running down the front of the window.

        It’s always interesting to see the little details that one can obsess over and how some matter, and others don’t at all.

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