The Cross House

13 Responses to The NE Corner. 100%!

    • Hi, Blair!

      I removed the downspout at the outside corner, and covered over the opening in the built-in gutter. It was not needed.

  1. Bravo Ross! Great job! I’m impressed by your progress. At the bottom flair which is in the shadow it looks like one of those optical illusions which asks are the darks the same color. It appears to be the same as the green and so much darker than the flair on the north side.
    On a side note, what kind of bush is that? It looks like it’s going to burst into full bloom any second. Such a beautiful contrast with the house.

    • Your “optical illusion” is the way that light plays on the various elements of a house that makes them work as accents. The parts that have no shadows look like they are lighter, whereas changes in angle cause shadows that make colors look different. Optical illusions are usually things that are painted or arranged in a way to falsify the effects that light naturally creates, causing something’s look to be other than what it is.
      -Ross, I hope I am not usurping by jumping in too soon with info about your shrub. You are likely to know what I am going to say already.
      -I can see from here that the bush/small tree is a CREPE MYRTLE, which are easy to grow if they do well in your climate. They like full sun and come in all of the ranges of purple to reds, light to dark, and white. You can get some that stay quite short through those that grow 40 plus feet tall.

      • Well done, Stewart. Ross might be busy at the moment. Thank you for replying in behalf of our champion of the Cross House, Ross.

  2. Ross, it looks so nice! Your neighbors will love you even more. I’m looking forward to this side being done and then on to the south side.

    • No disrespect Sandra, but you made me look again, and this is not something that one votes on. It is either crepe myrtle, or I will turn in my gardening gloves. (I actually don’t use gloves when I garden so I’m not risking much.)
      Crepe myrtle has both an entirely different way of growing than Rose of Sharon,aka Althea, and its flowers are spikes of florets which emerge over time at the end of branches.
      link to Crepe Myrtle images on Google:
      //www.google.com/search?q=crepe+myrtle+images&client=firefox-b-1-ab&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiz0JaY8obcAhWorVkKHaZRCwwQ7AkIRg&biw=1682&bih=853
      Althea flowers are single blooms with good sized petals and a fuzzy interior pistil.
      link to Althea images on Google:
      https://www.google.com/search?q=althea+pistil&client=firefox-b-1-ab&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwifkrOm8YbcAhXhuFkKHdnWAdQQ7AkIdg&biw=1682&bih=853#imgrc=_
      -One of my earliest childhood memories is of my uncle folding the petals of an Althea flower over a bumblebee that had gone inside the base of the flower in search of the thing that bees search for. (I don’t judge, many say they are in search of honey or pollen, but I suspect that they spend quite a bit of their days enjoying the beauty of the flowers up close and personal)
      He, (daringly,I thought), held the petal ends together for a while as the bee buzzed and bumbled inside his temporary cage. When he let go of the petals, quickly pulling his hand out of stinger range, the bee emerged and flew off. I know my Rose of Sharon.

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