The Cross House

Small Bits

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I have done several back-to-back posts about issues which upset my delicate sensibilities. Continuing this theme, I present this affront. See the gray painted threshold? Oh, the horror! The horror!

 

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To remedy this affront to humanity, I glopped paint-stripper on the threshold. In almost an instant, oak was revealed!

 

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Oak! (NOTE: I have the missing vestibule tiles. Do not be alarmed!)

 

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More oak!

 

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The uncovered threshold had variations of tone. I could have sanded the whole down to like-new tonality but was reluctant to trash the hard-won vestiges of age.

 

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So, with a light sanding, and three coats of Spar marine varnish, I am proud to present…the After. Oh, and the…

 

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…before, again. It should be noted that my sensibilities are, at the moment, calmed.

 

 

 

 

 

13 Responses to Small Bits

  1. I’m glad you left the vestiges of age. It tells the story of your house. People entered the house to the right over and over again with dirt and wet shoes, and left their mark. It’s the difference between a new home and a historic home. Your home has a story to tell. The entrance looks stunning.

  2. Look closely at the BEFORE picture. Not only is the threshold PAINTED, the right side is painted green, with the left side painted gray. Who paints like this?

  3. How do you get the wood so “Clean” looking after you’ve stripped it? I’m trying to strip the bedroom doors in my house and the paint comes off, but then the door still looks like it has a glaze of paint on it, kind of. Your house looks great, better and better each day.

    • I suspect they installed the doors in a new location and are afraid to tell me. If so, I would still like to know, and SEE the doors, and take images and measurements.

  4. — I really like the way you painted the trim below the threshold green rather than gray. It’s such a big improvement that I’m surprised that you didn’t point it out in this post. Your attention to these details is one of the best things about this blog.

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