The Cross House

Water Tabled!

The east extension, a while back. EEK!

 

The east extension, todayl

 

Of note is the water table just above the foundation. This is two pieces of custom-milled cedar matching the original. A cool detail, distinctive to the Cross House. That is Justin, left.

 

The bottom of the water table is supposed to align with the upper edge of the stone foundation, but this corner had shifted over the last 123-years. So, I had a brown metal cap computer crimped to cover the top edge of the stone; its upper edge is tucked behind the water table.

 

I think I should be able to get all this painted this week, and boy what a difference that will make!

AND, the diamond-paned pantry windows will reappear!!!!!!!!

So, stay tuned to this channel!

 

 

12 Responses to Water Tabled!

  1. Hi Justin, great work ! Ross hope this storm moves on for your painting project. I just can’t wait to see the pantry and her windows ! If you have any extra diamond paned windows I only have one window in my pantry . .Lol

  2. I’ve always gotten a kick out of that little hut above the basement doors. What a silly thing.

    Are the basement doors Bilco? We had Bilco on our Victorian, though they were installed later than the 1886 build date. So many Victorians in our neighborhood have them, which is why I ask.

    • The hut was indeed a badly-built horror! I do not miss it!

      The basement entrance, which is original, currently has plywood covering it. I plan to order Bilco doors.

  3. Stay tuned? Try and stop us, LOL! I seriously doubt that there was this much excitement over progress on the Cross house back in 1894. Does it mean we are addicted when we catch ourselves checking the weather forecast for Emporia when we live hundreds of miles away? πŸ™‚

  4. I have really enjoyed binge reading your restoration journey. Thanks for all the great catalogs and sites. I have book marked a ton of them for future reading.

    Id like to add if I may this way cool book I have in my library. Its called The Curtain Makers Handbook. This is a reprint of F.A. Moreland’s Practical Decorative Upholstery. It was originally published in 1889. It is filled with pictures and instructions for all kinds of drapery including mantles. Unfortunately most of this festoonery is too fancy for my 1860,s country center hall colonial.

    Your woodwork is so detailed it seems a shame to cover it up. I wonder how your windows would look with just an elaborate cornice board. Or maybe just swags and jabots.

    Here.

    Here.

    • I am glad you are enjoying the blog! Thank you!

      I am not covering up much woodwork. All the curtains will be below the stained-glass windows, and many will be tied back to one side, leaving the other side wholly exposed.

  5. I never thought I would say a sentence like this, but wow that computer crimped brown metal cap is so satisfying. πŸ™‚

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